The rebuilding project of the 1950's

Photo:Photo's from the interior of the one of the temporary Tyrrell and Green shops, 1954

Photo's from the interior of the one of the temporary Tyrrell and Green shops, 1954

Photo:An artist's impression of the new permanent Tyrrell and Green department store

An artist's impression of the new permanent Tyrrell and Green department store

Photo:A guide to the different Tyrrell and Green shops, from a Gazette of 1955

A guide to the different Tyrrell and Green shops, from a Gazette of 1955

By Jonathan Blatchford

Striding forward

The fortuitous yet insightful decision to move Tyrell and Green to Winchester really boosted the branch’s fortunes when it needed it most. In the year after the war, sales were in fact way above pre-war achievements. Tyrrell and Green was by no means the only shop to suffer as a result of the war. But other retailers continued to languish in the post-war years, whilst Tyrell and Green continued to stride forward.

A new permanent building becomes a neccessity

In 1948, the ground floor of a temporary building on the old site at Above Bar was opened for certain furnishing departments. There followed a number of other temporary building, confusing to say the least. However, by the early 1950’s, it became apparent that temporary premises would no longer suffice. Increased sales and the rebuilding and growth of competitors made a new, permanent building an absolute necessity. By 1954, the chance had finally arrived to begin construction of a permanent store, again on the bomb site.

Winchester branch closes

That same year, the Winchester branch closed, its services no longer required. The new building was set to be a highly modern structure, offering the very latest products, with the best facilities.

This page was added by Jonathan Blatchford on 27/08/2014.

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